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CADILLAC REPAIR ORANGE COUNTY
CLOSE TO IRVINE AUTO CENTER - Car Repair: Aliso Viejo, Irvine, Lake Forest, Rancho Santa Margarita, Lake Forest, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Laguna Niguel, Trabucco Hills, Foothill Ranch, Laguna Woods, San Juan Capistrano
TOYOTA - HONDA - LEXUS - NISSAN - ACURA - INFINITI - MITSUBISHI - SUBARU - FORD - GMC - GM - VOLKSVAGEN - SUZUKI - KIA - CHEVROLET - CHRYSLER - DODGE - CADILLAC - MERCURY - BUICK - LINCOLN - SATURN - PONTIAC - OLDSMOBILE - HYUNDAI - PLYMOUTH

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25721 Taladro Circle Unit A,
Mission Viejo, CA 92691
ORANGE COUNTY

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Anaheim 92801, 92802, 92803, 92804, 92805, 92806, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92812, 92814, 92815, 92816, 92817, 92825, 92850, 92899, Brea 92821, 92822, 92823, Buena Park 90620, 90621, 90622, 90623, 90624, Costa Mesa 92626, 92627, 92628, Cypress 90630, Fountain Valley 92708, 92728, Fullerton 92831, 92832, 92833, 92834, 92835, 92836, 92837, 92838, Garden Grove 92840, 92841, 92842, 92843, 92844, 92845, 92846, Huntington Beach 92605, 92615, 92646, 92647, 92648, 92649, La Habra 90631, 90632, 90633, La Palma 90623, Los Alamitos 90720, 90721, Orange 92856, 92857, 92859, 92861, 92862, 92863, 92864, 92865, 92866, 92867, 92868, 92869, Placentia 92870, 92871, Santa Ana 92701, 92702, 92703, 92704, 92705, 92706, 92707, 92708, 92711, 92712, 92725, 92728, 92735, 92799, Seal Beach 90740, Stanton 90680, Tusin 92780, 92781, 92782, Villa Park 92861, 92867, Westminister 92683, 92684, 92685, Yorba Linda 92885, 92886, 92887, Aliso Viejo 92653, 92656, 92698, Dana Point 92624, 92629, Irvine 92602, 92603, 92604, 92606, 92612, 92614, 92616, 92618, 92619, 92620, 92623, 92650, 92697, 92709, 92710, Laguna Beach 92607, 92637, 92651, 92652, 92653, 92654, 92656, 92677, 92698, Laguna Hills 92637, 92653, 92654, 92656, Laguna Niguel 92607, 92677, Laguna Woods 92653, 92654, Lake Forest 92609, 92630, Mission Viejo 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92694, Newport Beach 92657, 92658, 92659, 92660, 92661, 92662, 92663, Rancho Santa Margarita 92688, San Clemente 92672, 92673, 92674, San Juan Capistrano 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92693, 92694 Ladera Ranch 92694, Coto De Caza 92679 Anaheim Hills 92807, 92808, 92809, 92817 Dove Canyon 92679 Oceanside, CA:92049, 92051, 92052, 92054, 92055, 92056, 92057, 92058, Dove Canyon 92679


We can work on the following Cars, Trucks, Vans, SUVs, and RVs: Toyota, Honda, Lexus, Nissan, Infiniiti, Acura, Mitsubishi, Hyundia, Isuzu, Subaru, Mazda, Saturn, Land Rover, , GM, GMC, Ford, , Hummer, Jaguar, Volvo, Chrysler, Volkswagen, Volvo, Saab, Kia, Audi, Cadillac, Chevrolet, Buick, Aston Martin, Alfa Romeo, Ferrari, Oldsmobile, Peugeot, Porsche, Saturn, Pontiac,Corvette, Lincoln, Daewoo, -Benz, Daimler AG, Holden, Opel, Dodge, Plymoth, Rolls-Royce, Prius, Highlander, Camry, Civic, Accent, Insight, Escape, Tahoe, GS 450h, Lexus LS 600h L, RX 400h, Mercury Mariner, Altima, Datsun, Blue Bird, SunnyBrook, Airstream, National RV, Thor, Starcraft, Georgie Boy, Rexhall, Holiday Rambler, Dutchmen, Newmar, Jayco, R-Vision, Keystone, Monaco, Forest River, Gulf Stream, Coachmen, Fleetwood, Winnebago.

WELCOME CADILLAC OWNERS:

CADILLAC REPAIR IN ORANGE COUNTY
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Larry's Independent Service has been specializing in the service and repair of CADILLAC automobiles for OVER 22 YEARS. We're your premier CADILLAC repair and maintenance option because we have exceptional service
You won't find another repair facility that will take better care of
YOU and YOUR CADILLAC.

CADILLAC REPAIR

We are committed to you with fast, quality preventative maintenance service to help preserve the health of your CADILLAC. You'll also enjoy the efficiency of our professional staff who is devoted to exceptional service, personal attention and respect for your time.

We are fully computerized and maintain all of your vehicle's history in our network storage. If you ever happen to develop car trouble while you are out of town and they try to sell you a "necessary part", all you have to do is call us and we can tell you whether the component had been either repaired or replaced previously. And at the end of the year, if you need your records for tax purposes, we'll gladly print you an itemized list of all the services and repairs to help you speed up your tax return.

Our waiting room is setup so that you can wait comfortably whenever you might need a quick oil change, minor service or estimate. Enjoy our Wi-Fi enabled waiting room or we can turn the TV on for you!

WHAT MAKES US DIFFERENT FROM
CADILLAC DEALERSHIP SERVICE?

Personalized Service - To us you are not just another repair ticket. You are a CUSTOMER in every sense of the word!

Owner and/or Manager - Always on the premises.

Free Local Shuttle - To your home or office.

Above All-Empathy! - We are very much aware of how unexpected repair bills can put a dent in your budget. We will let you know the items that might need immediate attention and the ones that can wait for a next appointment.

We don't want you to be a "One Time Customer" - We want you to become a Customer and Friend for years to come.

Many service facilities have forgotten what the word CUSTOMER really means. We can assure you that we are fully aware of it's meaning and you will always get personalized service in all your vehicle's repairs and service needs.


Call us Today for Excellent Auto Service at (949) 830-4204.

ABOUT CADILLAC

Cadillac
Division
Industry Automotive
Predecessor Henry Ford Company
Founded Michigan, U.S.
August 22, 1902 (1902-08-22)
Founder
Headquarters New York City, New York, United States
Area served
United States, Canada, Mexico, Europe, Middle East(ex. Iran), China(incl. Taiwan), South Korea, Japan
Key people
Johan De Nysschen, President, Cadillac
Products Luxury vehicles
Production output
170,750 vehicles sold (2014)
Owner General Motors
Website www.cadillac.com
Footnotes / references

Cadillac, formally the Cadillac Motor Car Division, is a division of U.S.-based General Motors (GM) that markets luxury vehicles worldwide. Its primary markets are the United States, Canada, and China, but Cadillac-branded vehicles are distributed in 34 additional markets worldwide. Historically, Cadillac automobiles have always held a place at the top of the luxury field within the United States. In 2014, Cadillac's U.S. sales were 170,750 vehicles.

Cadillac is among the oldest automobile brands in the world, second in America only to fellow GM marque Buick. The firm was founded from the remnants of the Henry Ford Company in 1902, almost nine years before Chevrolet. It was named after Antoine Laumet de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac, who founded Detroit, Michigan. The Cadillac crest is based on his coat of arms.

By the time General Motors purchased the company in 1909, Cadillac had already established itself as one of America's premier luxury carmakers. The complete interchangeability of its precision parts had allowed it to lay the foundation for the modern mass production of automobiles. It was at the forefront of technological advances, introducing including full electrical systems, the clashless manual transmission and the steel roof. The brand developed three engines, with its V8 setting the standard for the American automotive industry.

Cadillac was the first American car to win the Royal Automobile Club of England's Dewar Trophy by successfully demonstrating the interchangeability of its component parts during a reliability test in 1908; this spawned the firm's slogan "Standard of the World". It won the trophy again in 1912 for incorporating electric starting and lighting in a production automobile.

Early history

Founding

Cadillac was formed from the remnants of the Henry Ford Company. After a dispute between Henry Ford and his investors, Ford left the company along with several of his key partners in March 1902. Ford's financial backers William Murphy and Lemuel Bowen called in engineer Henry M. Leland of Leland & Faulconer Manufacturing Company to appraise the plant and equipment in preparation for liquidating the company's assets. Instead, Leland persuaded the pair to continue manufacturing automobiles using Leland's proven single-cylinder engine. A new company called the Cadillac Automobile Company was established on 22 August 1902. It was named after French explorer Antoine Laumet de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac, who founded Detroit in 1701.

First automobiles

Cadillac's first automobiles, the Runabout and Tonneau, were completed in October 1902. They were two-seat horseless carriages powered by a 10 hp (7 kW) single-cylinder engine. They were practically identical to the 1903 Ford Model A. Many sources say the first car rolled out of the factory on 17 October; in the book Henry Leland – Master of Precision, the date is 20 October; another reliable source shows car number 3 to have been built on 16 October. Cadillac displayed the new vehicles at the New York Auto Show in January 1903, where the vehicles impressed the crowds enough to gather over 2,000 firm orders. Cadillac's biggest selling point was precision manufacturing, and therefore, reliability; a Cadillac was simply a better-made vehicle than its competitors.

Runabout
Rear-entrance tonneau
Special bodies

Notable events

The Cadillac Automobile Company merged with the Leland & Faulconer Manufacturing forming The Cadillac Motor Company in 1905.

From its earliest years, Cadillac aimed for precision engineering and stylish luxury finishes, causing its cars to be ranked amongst the finest in the United States.

Cadillac was the first volume manufacturer of a fully enclosed car in 1906. Cadillac participated in the 1908 interchangeability test in the United Kingdom, and was awarded the Dewar Trophy for the most important advancement of the year in the automobile industry. In 1912, Cadillac was the first automobile manufacturer to incorporate an electrical system enabling starting, ignition, and lighting.

Acquired by General Motors

Cadillac was purchased by the General Motors (GM) conglomerate in 1909. Cadillac became General Motors' prestige division, devoted to the production of large luxury vehicles. The Cadillac line was also GM's default marque for "commercial chassis" institutional vehicles, such as limousines, ambulances, hearses and funeral home flower cars, the last three of which were custom-built by aftermarket manufacturers.

It was positioned at the top of GM's vehicle hierarchy, above Buick, Oldsmobile, Oakland, and Chevrolet.

1910–1941

In 1915, Cadillac introduced a 90-degree flathead V8 engine with 70 horsepower (52 kW) at 2400 rpm and 180 pound force-feet (240 N·m) of torque, allowing its cars to attain 65 miles per hour. This was faster than most roads could accommodate at this time. Cadillac pioneered the dual-plane V8 crankshaft in 1918. In 1928 Cadillac introduced the first clashless Synchro-Mesh manual transmission, utilizing constant mesh gears. In 1930 Cadillac implemented the first V-16 engine, with a 45-degree overhead valve, 452 cubic inches (7.41 litres), and 165 horsepower (123 kW), one of the most powerful and quietest engines in the United States. The development and introduction of the V8, V16 and V-12 helped to make Cadillac the "Standard of the World". A later model of the V8 engine, known as the overhead valve, set the standard for the entire American automotive industry in 1949.

A 1921 Cadillac advertisement.

In July 1917, the United States Army needed a dependable staff car and chose the Cadillac Type 55 Touring Model after exhaustive tests on the Mexican border. 2,350 of the cars were supplied for use in France by officers of the American Expeditionary Force in World War I.

General Motors of Canada had built Cadillacs from 1923 until 1936 and LaSalles from 1927 until 1935.

Pre-World War II Cadillacs were well-built, powerful, mass-produced luxury cars aimed at an upper-class market. In the 1930s, Cadillac added cars with V12 and V16 engines to their range, many of which were fitted with custom coach-built bodies.

In 1926, Cadillac recruited automobile stylist Harley Earl in a one-time consulting capacity, but his employment lasted considerably longer: by 1928, Earl was the head of the new Art and Color division and he would ultimately work for GM until he retired, over 30 years later. The first car he designed was the LaSalle, a new, smaller "companion marque" car, named after another French explorer and founder of Detroit, Renι Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle. That marque remained in production until 1940.

Cadillac introduced designer-styled bodywork (as opposed to auto-engineered) in 1927. It installed shatter-resistant glass in 1926. Cadillac also introduced the "turret top", the first all-steel roof on a passenger car. Previously, car roofs had been made out of fabric-covered wood.

The Great Depression sapped the auto industry generally, with the luxury market declining more steeply; between 1928–1933, Cadillac sales had declined by 84%, to 6,736 vehicles. Exacerbating sales performance for the Cadillac brand was a policy, reflective of the times, which discouraged sales to African Americans. Nick Dreystadt, mechanic and national head of Cadillac service, urged a committee – set up to decide whether the Cadillac brand would live on – to revoke that policy. After the policy was eliminated, brand sales increased by 70% in 1934 – and Dreystadt was promoted to lead the entire Cadillac Division.

By 1940, Cadillac sales had risen tenfold compared to 1934. In 1936, Dreystadt released the Series 60 as Cadillac's entry into the mid-priced vehicle market. It was replaced by the Series 61 in 1939, but a popular model that was derived from it, the Sixty Special, continued through 1993. Another factor helped boost Cadillac growth over the next few years: a revolution in assembly line technology. In 1934, Henry F. Phillips introduced the Phillips screw and driver to the market. He entered into talks with General Motors and convinced the Cadillac group that his new screws would speed assembly times and therefore increase profits. Cadillac was the first automaker to use the Phillips technology in 1937, which was widely adopted in 1940. For the first time in many years all cars built by the company shared the same basic engine and drivetrain in 1941.

1941 also saw introduction of optional Hydra-Matic, the first mass-produced fully automatic transmission, offered the previous year on the Oldsmobile.

After World War II

1948 Cadillac

Postwar Cadillac vehicles innovated many of the styling features that came to be synonymous with the late 1940s and 1950s American automobile. Incorporating many of the ideas of then General Motors styling chief Harley J. Earl, these included tailfins, wraparound windshields, and extensive use of chrome.

Tailfins were first added in 1948 and reached their apex in 1959. From 1960 to 1964 they decreased each year until they disappeared in the 1965 model year (remaining vestigialy only on the limited production 1965 Series 75 chassis, a carry-over from 1964).

Cadillac's other distinctive styling attribute was its front-bumper. What had started out after the war as a pair of artillery shell-shaped bumper guards moved higher in the front-end design as the 1950s wore on. Becoming known as Dagmar bumpers for their similarity to the buxom 1950s television personality, they were toned down in 1958 and gone the next year. 1956 saw the introduction of the pillarless four-door hardtop sedan, marketed as the "Sedan deVille"; a year later the feature appeared in all standard Cadillacs.

Fledgling automotive magazine Motor Trend awarded its first "Motor Trend Car of the Year" to Cadillac in 1949 for its innovative overhead valve V8 engine. While the company initially snubbed the honor, it now proudly references its "Car of the Year" wins in publicity materials.

On November 25, 1949, Cadillac produced its one millionth car, a 1950 Coupe de Ville. It also set a new sales mark of 100,000 cars, matched in 1950 and 1951. 1949 also saw the introduction with Buick of the first mass-produced hardtop coupe, a closed body style without a "B" pillar. Marketed as the Coupe de Ville, it would become one of Cadillac's most popular models for many years.

In 1951 Cadillac began production of the M41 Walker Bulldog army tank, which saw service in the Korean and Vietnam wars.

In 1953, the "Autronic Eye" was introduced. This feature would automatically dim high-beam headlamps for the safety of oncoming motorists.

In 1957, Cadillac attempted to move upmarket, creating the hand-built Series 70 Eldorado Brougham. It featured self-levelling suspension, "memory seat" function, and an industry first all-transistor signal-seeking car radio produced by GM's Delco Radio. While the car showed Cadillac's technological prowess, it only sold 904 units.

Cadillac Eldoradio Brougham all-transistor car radio-1957 dash
Installing a transmission on a Cadillac in Wayne, Michigan, 1973

The dual-reservoir brake master cylinder, with separate front and rear hydraulic systems, was introduced in 1962, six years ahead of the Federal requirement. The first fully automatic heater-air conditioning system also appeared, as did the three-speed Turbo-Hydramatic automatic transmission; it would become the GM standard model for several decades. From the late 1960s, Cadillac offered a fiber-optic warning system[citation needed] to alert the driver to failed light bulbs. The use of extensive bright-work on the exterior and interior also decreased each year after 1959. By the 1966 model year, even the rear bumpers ceased to be all chrome – large portions were painted, including the headlight bezels.

In 1966, Cadillac had its best annual sales yet, over 192,000 units (142,190 of them de Villes), an increase of more than 60%. This was exceeded in 1968, when Cadillac topped 200,000 units for the first time. 1967 and 1968 saw the introduction of a host of Federally-mandated safety features, including energy-absorbing steering columns and wheels, soft interior and instrument panel knobs and surfaces, front shoulder belts, and side marker lights.

The front-wheel drive Eldorado was launched in 1967, setting a new standard for a personal luxury car. Its simple, elegant design was a far cry from the tail-fin and chrome excesses of the 1950s. Cadillac's success grew against rivals Lincoln and Imperial, Division sales topping all of Chrysler for the first time in 1970. The new 472 cu in (7.7 l) engine that debuted in the 1968 model year, designed for an ultimate capacity potential of 600 cu in (9.8 l), was increased to 500 cu in (8.2 l) for the 1970 Eldorado. It was adopted across the model range beginning in 1975. Driver airbags began to be offered on some Cadillac models from 1974 to 1976. The pillarless Coupe deVille ended with the 1973 model, while the Sedan deVille remained pillarless through 1976.

The 1970s saw new extremes in vehicle luxury and dimension. The 1972 Fleetwood was some 1.7 in (43 mm) longer in wheelbase and 4 in (100 mm) overall, compared to the 1960 Series 75 Fleetwood; the entry-level 1972 Calais was 2.4 in (61.0 mm) longer than the equivalent 1960 Series 62, on the same wheelbase. Models gained a smoother ride while vehicle weight, standard equipment, and engine displacement were all increased. Cadillac experienced record sales in 1973 and again in the late 1970s.

1977 experienced the same "downsizing" as the rest of GM's "B" and "C" bodied cars. DeVille models lost hundreds of pounds, got smaller exterior dimensions and engines, but gained taller windows. Fuel economy and handling improved.

The 1980s saw a downsizing of many models, and the introduction of the brand's first front-wheel drive compact, the Cimarron. Detroit Assembly on Clark Street in Detroit, where Cadillacs had been made since 1921, closed in 1987.

In the late 1990s, Cadillac fielded its first ever entry in the growing SUV segment. The Escalade, introduced in 1999, was marketed to compete with the Lincoln Navigator and luxury SUVs from various import brands.

The Art and Science era

Cadillac introduced a new design philosophy for the 21st century called "Art and Science" which it claims "incorporates sharp, sheer forms and crisp edges – a form vocabulary that expresses bold, high-technology design and invokes the technology used to design it." This new design language spread from the original CTS and to the Cadillac XLR roadster. Cadillac's model lineup mostly includes rear- and all-wheel-drive sedans, roadsters, crossovers and SUVs. The only exceptions were the front-wheel drive Cadillac BLS (which was not sold in North America) and the Cadillac DTS, neither of which are still in production. The second-generation CTS-V is a direct competitor to the BMW M5. An automatic version of the CTS-V lapped the Nόrburgring in 7:59.32, at the time a record for production sedans.

Models

Assembly plants

Moreover, Russian company Avtotor leads assembly models Cadillac CTS, Cadillac SRX and Cadillac Escalade in Kaliningrad city.

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Awards

Cadillac has been won the US Car of the Year award five times:

2014 Cadillac CTS
2008 Cadillac CTS
1992 Cadillac Seville Touring Sedan
1952 Cadillac Motor Division
1949 Cadillac Motor Division - for innovations in overhead valve V8 engine design

Motorsport

The Cadillac racing logo

Before the outbreak of World War II, Cadillac (like most manufacturers) participated in various types of motorsport. Many Allard automobiles used Cadillac engines.

In the 1950s, Cadillac (like all American manufacturers at the time) participated in the NASCAR Grand National Series. The brand disappeared from the series by the 1960s.

Cadillac powered the Cadillac Northstar LMP a Le Mans Prototype in the early years of the American Le Mans Series from 2000 to 2002. When the prototype proved unsuccessful, Cadillac withdrew from the series.

Cadillac's most successful venture into motorsport in recent years has been its use of the CTS-V in the SCCA World Challenge Grand Touring class.

References

  1. ^ "Form 10-K Annual Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 for the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2012 Commission File Number 001-34960 General Motors Company" (PDF). General Motors. General Motors Company. 15 February 2013. Archived from the original on 6 August 2013. Retrieved 6 August 2013. 
  2. ^ Rick Kranz (30 November 2011). "Cadillac Develops New Strategy In Europe". Automotive News. Retrieved 27 December 2011. 
  3. ^ http://media.gm.com/media/us/en/gm/news.detail.html/content/Pages/news/us/en/2015/Jan/0105-cadillac-sales-gm.html
  4. ^ General Motors (1954). "Cars That Built GM: An Album of Historic General Motors Cars" (PDF). p. 8,12. Retrieved 12 October 2014. 
  5. ^ General Motors (1954). "Cars That Built GM: An Album of Historic General Motors Cars" (PDF). p. 10,12,14,16. Retrieved 12 June 2014. 
  6. ^ "Cadillac, Antoine de la Mothe, Sieur de". S9.com. 11 September 2007. Retrieved 14 June 2012. 
  7. ^ Granzo T History of Detroit
  8. ^ "Cadillac: A Century of Excellence" by Rob Leicester Wagner (ISBN 978-1-58663-168-0)
  9. ^ Nazario (17 May 2012). "The Continual Innovation and History of Cadillac". GearHeads. Retrieved 14 June 2012. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f Laam, Michael (January 2002). "100 Years of Cadillac History". Popular Mechanics. Archived from the original on 27 September 2013. 
  11. ^ "1909, Cadillac Enters the Fold". Generations of GM History. GM Heritage Center. Retrieved 26 July 2011. 
  12. ^ Bentley, John The Old Car Book, Fawcett Books (1952) p 12
  13. ^ GM Heritage Center, http://history.gmheritagecenter.com/wiki/index.php/Canada_Only_General_Motors_Cars
  14. ^ a b "1930–1939 Cadillac". Retrieved 29 June 2011. 
  15. ^ "Earl, Harley J. GM's First Design Chief". Generations of GM History. 
  16. ^ Gordon, John Steele"The Man Who Saved The Cadillac". Forbes. 30 April 2009. Retrieved 23 October 2011. 
  17. ^ a b Gordon.
  18. ^ "The Beginning of the Phillips Screw Company". Phillips Screw Company. Retrieved 3 June 2011. 
  19. ^ Bonsall, p. 17
  20. ^ a b "1957 & 58 Cadillac Eldorado Brougham". Generations of GM History. GM Heritage Center. Retrieved 26 July 2011. 
  21. ^ Flory, J. "Kelly", Jr. American Cars 1946-1959 (Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Coy, 2008), p. 190.
  22. ^ a b http://media.cadillac.com/media/us/en/cadillac/news.detail.html/content/Pages/news/us/en/2013/Nov/1107-cts-coty.html
  23. ^ a b Flory, p. 255.
  24. ^ Flory, p.323.
  25. ^ 80 Years of Cadillac LaSalle by Walter M.P. McCall, Motorbooks International, Osceola WI, 1992, p. 298
  26. ^ http://cadillacdatabase.com/Dbas_txt/brg02.htm
  27. ^ 1956 GM Year-End Annual Report, 1957 Cadillac Eldorado Brougham car model introduction announcement, pg 15
  28. ^ Radio & TV News, August 1957, "Delco's All-Transistor Auto Radio", pg 60
  29. ^ The Cadillac Serviceman, Volume XXXI, No.4, April 1957 issue, Pg 34
  30. ^ Flory, J. "Kelly", Jr. (2004), American Cars 1960–1972, Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Coy, pp. 423, 425–428 
  31. ^ Flory, p. 423
  32. ^ Flory, p. 570. Karl Ludvigsen's "Cadillac: The Great American Dream Come True", in Northey, Tom, ed. World of Automobiles (London: Orbis, 1974), Vol. 3, p. 297, mistakenly dates this to 1967.
  33. ^ Flory, p. 721.
  34. ^ "Cadillac Eldorado History". Edmunds. 24 October 2011. 
  35. ^ Flory, pp. 20, 23, 878, & 880.
  36. ^ Robyn Meredith (12 November 1999). "THE MEDIA BUSINESS: ADVERTISING; Cadillac is redesigning its image before its retooled cars appear." (The New York Times). The New York Times. Retrieved 28 June 2010. 
  37. ^ "2006 Cadillac BLS – Car News". Car and Driver. Retrieved 9 June 2010. 
  38. ^ "2009 Cadillac CTS-V vs. 2008 BMW M5 SMG". Road & Track. 
  39. ^ "Cadillac CTS-V Blisters the Ring in Under 8 Minutes". worldcarfans.com. Retrieved 28 June 2010. 
  40. ^ "??????? - GM". 
  41. ^ Lieberman, Jonny (January 2014). "Motor Trend Car of the Year 2014: The Strong Thrive: The 65th Anniversary of our Signature Award Finds the Automotive Industry Stronger Than Ever". Motor Trend (Source Interlink Media) 66 (1): 42–45. ISSN 0027-2094. OCLC 423854316. Archived from the original on 2013-12-07. Retrieved 2013-12-07. Our mission was to determine exactly which of this year's 22 new or significantly refreshed contenders is in fact the best. 

From 1902 to the modern day, Cadillac, a brand of General Motors, has introduced many models with differing engines to establish itself as the premier luxury car in the United States.

Historical and classic, 1902-1949

Early Antique

  • 1902-1903 Cadillac Runabout and Tonneau — 72 in wheelbase single-cylinder engine
  • 1903-1904 Cadillac Model A — 72 in wheelbase single-cylinder engine
  • 1904 Cadillac Models A and B
    • Model A — 72 in wheelbase single-cylinder engine
    • Model B — 76 in wheelbase single-cylinder engine
  • 1905 Cadillac Models B, C, D, E and F
  • 1906 Cadillac Models H, K, L, and M
    • Model H — 102 in wheelbase four-cylinder engine
    • Model K — 74 in wheelbase single-cylinder engine
    • Model L — 110 in wheelbase four-cylinder engine
    • Model M — 76 in wheelbase single-cylinder engine
  • 1907 Cadillac Models G, H, K, and M
    • Model G — 100 in wheelbase four-cylinder engine
    • Model H — 102 in wheelbase four-cylinder engine
    • Model K — 74 in wheelbase single-cylinder engine
    • Model M — 76 in wheelbase single-cylinder engine
  • 1908 Cadillac Models G, H, M, S and T
    • Model G — 100 in wheelbase four-cylinder engine
    • Model H — 102 in wheelbase four-cylinder engine
    • Model M — 76 in wheelbase single-cylinder engine
    • Model S — 82 in wheelbase single-cylinder engine
    • Model T — 82 in wheelbase single-cylinder engine
  • 1909-1911 Cadillac Model Thirty
    • 1909 — 106 in wheelbase four-cylinder engine
    • 1910 — 110 in wheelbase; 120 in wheelbase (limousine) four-cylinder engine Fisher
    • 1911 — 116 in wheelbase four-cylinder engine Fisher
  • 1912 — Cadillac Model 1912; 116 in wheelbase four-cylinder engine Fisher
  • 1913 — Cadillac Model 1913; 120 in wheelbase four-cylinder engine Fisher
  • 1914 — Cadillac Model 1914; 120 and 134 in wheelbase four-cylinder engine Fisher
  • 1915 — Cadillac Type 51; 122  and 145 in wheelbase V8 Fisher
  • 1916 — Cadillac Type 53; 122  132  and 145 in wheelbase V8 Fisher
  • 1917 — Cadillac Type 55; 125  and 145 in wheelbase V8 Fisher
  • 1918-1919 Cadillac Type 57; 125  132  and 145 in wheelbase V8 Fisher

1920s

  • 1920-1921 Cadillac Type 59; 122  and 132 in wheelbase V8 Fisher
  • 1922-1923 Cadillac Type 61; 132 in wheelbase V8 Fisher
  • 1924 — Cadillac Type V-63; 132  and 145 in wheelbase V8 Fisher
  • 1925 — Cadillac Type V-63; 132  138  and 145 in wheelbase V8 Fisher Fleetwood
  • 1926-1927 Cadillac Series 314; 132  138  and 150 in wheelbase V8 Fisher Fleetwood
  • 1928 — Cadillac Series 341-A; 140  and 152 in wheelbase V8 Fisher Fleetwood
  • 1929 — Cadillac Series 341-B; 140  and 152 in wheelbase V8 Fisher Fleetwood

1930s

  • 1930 Cadillac Series 353, 370 and 452 Fisher Fleetwood
    • Series 353 — 140  and 152 in wheelbase V8 Fisher Fleetwood
    • Series 370 — 140  143  and 152 in wheelbase V12 Fisher Fleetwood
    • Series 452 — 148 in wheelbase V16 Fisher Fleetwood
  • 1931 Cadillac Series 355, 370-A and 452-A Fisher Fleetwood
    • Series 355 — 134  and 152 in wheelbase V8 Fleetwood
    • Series 370-A — 140  143  and 152 in wheelbase V12 Fleetwood
    • Series 452-A — 148 in wheelbase V16 Fisher Fleetwood
  • 1932 Cadillac Series 355-B, 370-B and 452-B Fisher Fleetwood
    • Series 355-B — 134  and 156 in wheelbase V8 Fisher Fleetwood
    • Series 370-B — 140  and 156 in wheelbase V12 Fisher Fleetwood
    • Series 452-B — 143 and 149 in wheelbase V16 Fisher Fleetwood
  • 1933 Cadillac Series 355-C, 370-C and 452-C Fisher Fleetwood
  • 1934 Cadillac Series 10, 20, 30 and 452-D Fisher Fleetwood
  • 1935 Cadillac Series 10, 20, 30 and 452-D Fisher Fleetwood
  • 1936 Cadillac Series 36-60, 36-70, 36-75, 36-80, 36-85, 36-90 Fisher Fleetwood
  • 1937 Cadillac Series 36-60, 37-65, 37-70, 37-75, 37-85, 37-90 Fisher Fleetwood
  • 1938 Cadillac Series 38-60, 38-60S, 38-65, 38-75, 38-90 Fisher Fleetwood
  • 1939 Cadillac Series 39-60S, 39-65, 39-75, 39-90 Fisher Fleetwood

1940s

1950s (Finned Fifties)

Chiang Kai-shek's Cadillac

1960s

1970s

1980s

1990s

2000s

2010s/Current

Concepts, prototypes

  • Cadillac Caribbean, Coupe de Ville, El Rancho, Embassy — 1949
  • Cadillac Debutante — 1950
  • Cadillac custom roadster for Bill Boyer — 1951-52
  • Cadillac Eldorado and Townsman — 1952
  • Cadillac Le Mans, Orleans — 1953
  • Cadillac El Camino, La Espada, Park Avenue, PF 200 Cabriolet — 1954 [a custom job by Pinin Farina on 1953 Cadillac chassis, for private client]
  • Cadillac Celebrity, Eldorado Brougham, La Salle II Roadster and Sedan, Eldorado St. Moritz, Westchester — 1955
  • Cadillac Castilian, Gala, Maharani, Palomino, Eldorado Brougham and Eldorado Brougham Town Car — 1956
  • Cadillac Director — 1957
  • Cadillac "Bubble-Top" parade car — 1957
  • Cadillac "Rain Car" and 4-door Eldorado Seville — 1958
  • Cadillac Skylight coupe/convertible — 1958
  • Cadillac Cyclone — 1959 [later rebodied]
  • Cadillac "Bubble-Top" parade car [built in Canada] — 1959
  • Cadillac Starlight — 1959
  • Cadillac 4-door phaeton — 1960
  • Cadillac Eldorado Chicago Show Car — 1961
  • Cadillac XP-715 La Salle — 1961
  • Cadillac Florentine — 1964
  • Cadillac XP-840 Eldorado Fastback — 1965
  • Cadillac NART — 1970
  • Cadillac TAG Function Car — 1978 [a test vehicle on Eldorado chassis by Swiss coach builder, Franco Sbarro]
  • Cadillac Cimarron — 1985
  • Cadillac Voyage — 1988
  • Cadillac Solitaire — 1989
  • Cadillac Aurora — 1990
  • Cadillac Evoq — 1999
  • Cadillac Eldorado — 2000
  • Cadillac Imaj — 2000
  • Cadillac Vizon — 2001
  • Cadillac Cien — 2002
  • Cadillac Sixteen — 2003
  • Cadillac BLS and Villa — 2005
  • Cadillac Provoq — 2008
  • Cadillac CTS Coupe — 2008
  • Cadillac Converj (PHEV) — 2009
  • Cadillac World Thorium Fuel (WTF) — 2009
  • Cadillac XTS Platinum — 2010
  • Cadillac Aera — 2010
  • Cadillac Urban Luxury Concept (ULC) — 2010
  • Cadillac Ciel — 2011
  • Cadillac Elmiraj — 2013

External links


ABOUT ALISO VIEJO CALIFORNIA
Aliso Viejo is a city in Orange County, California, United States. As of the 2000 census, Aliso Viejo population was 40,166. Aliso Viejo became Orange County's 34th city on July 1, 2001, and has been the only city in Orange County to incorporate since 2000. It borders the cities of Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Laguna Niguel, and Laguna Woods. Aliso Viejo was originally part of the 22,000 acre Moulton Ranch. The Moulton family took title in the 1890's to land originally granted to Juan Avila by the Mexican government in 1842. In 1976, Mission Viejo Company purchased the last 6,600 acres for a new planned community that is now part of the City of Aliso Viejo. The first residential units were offered in March of 1982 and the first residents arrived in November of the same year. (previous information from The City of Aliso Viejo) Aliso Viejo became Orange County 's 34th city on July 1, 2001. The first planned community in Orange County, it was targeted to middle and upper-middle income homebuyers. Aliso Viejo had only 7,600 residents in 1990. Developers were building homes, condos and apartments so fast that there were waiting lists and lotteries held for singles and couples anxious to be a part of the community. By 2000, the population expanded by 32,000 residents, making it the top city in population growth in Orange County. The zipcodes of Aliso Viejo are: 92653, 92656, 92698
ABOUT IRVINE CALIFORNIA

Irvine borders Tustin and is an incorporated city in Orange County, California, United States. It is a planned city, mainly developed by the Irvine Company since the 1960s. Formally incorporated on December 28, 1971, the 69.7 square mile (180.5 km²) city has a population of 202,079 (as of 2007). It has annexed in the past an undeveloped area to the north, and has also annexed the former El Toro Marine Corps Air Station, most of which is to be made into a park called the Orange County Great Park. Currently, Irvine is larger in land area than any other city in Orange County because of its annexation of the southern and eastern unincorporated areas. In June 2007, it was named The Safest City in the United States (Irvine has held the title since 2005)

Irvine is home to the University of California, Irvine (UCI), the Orange County Center of University of Southern California, and the Irvine Campus of Alliant International University, Concordia University, California State University Fullerton, Pepperdine University and Irvine Valley College.

The Irvine Zipcodes are: 92602, 92603, 92604, 92606, 92612, 92614, 92616, 92618, 92619, 92620, 92623, 92650, 92697, 92709, 92710


HISTORY OF IRVINE
Evidence of early campsites and rock shelters in the undeveloped parts of the city puts prehistoric man in the Irvine area at least 12,000 years ago. Irvine was inhabited by the Gabrielino Indians about 2,000 years ago. Gaspar de Portola, a Spanish explorer, came to the area in 1769. This brought on the establishment of forts, missions and herds of cattle. The King of Spain parceled out land for missions and private use. After Mexico's independence from Spain in 1821, the Mexican government secularized the missions and assumed control of the lands. It began distributing the land to Mexican citizens who applied for grants. Three large Spanish/Mexican grants made up the land that later became the Irvine Ranch: Rancho Santiago de Santa Ana, Rancho San Joaquin and Rancho Lomas de Santiago. In 1864, Jose Sepulveda, owner of Rancho San Joaquin sold 50,000 acres (200 km²) to Benjamin and Thomas Flint, Llewellyn Bixby and James Irvine for $18,000 to resolve debts due to the Great Drought. In 1866, Irvine, Flint and Bixby acquired 47,000-acre (190 km²) Rancho Lomas de Santiago for $7,000. After the Mexican-American war the land of Rancho Santiago de Santa Ana fell prey to tangled titles. In 1868, the ranch was divided among four claimants as part of a lawsuit: Flint, Bixby and Irvine. The ranches were devoted to sheep grazing. However, in 1870, tenant farming was permitted.

In 1878, James Irvine acquired his partners' interests for $150,000. His 110,000 acres (450 km²) stretched 23 miles (37 km) from the Pacific Ocean to the Santa Ana River. James Irvine died in 1886. The ranch was inherited by his son, James Irvine, Jr. who incorporated it into The Irvine Company. James, Jr. shifted the ranch operations to field crops, olive and citrus crops. In 1888, the Santa Fe Railroad extended its line to Fallbrook Junction (north of San Diego) and named a station along the way after James Irvine. The town that formed around this station was named Myford, after Irvine's son, because a post office in Calaveras County already bore the family name. The town was later renamed Irvine, however, in 1914.[1] By 1918, 60,000 acres (240 km²) of lima beans were grown on the Irvine Ranch. Two Marine Corps facilities were built on the ranch during World War II and sold to the government. James Irvine, Jr. died in 1947 at the age of 80. His son, Myford, assumed the presidency of The Irvine Company. He began opening small sections of the Irvine Ranch to urban development. Myford died in 1959. The same year, the University of California asked The Irvine Company for 1,000 acres (4 km²) for a new university campus. The Irvine Company gave away the requested land and the State purchased an additional 500 acres (2 km²).
William Pereira, the University's consulting architect, and The Irvine Company planners drew up master plans for a city of 50,000 people surrounding the new university. The area would include industrial, residential and recreational areas, commercial centers and greenbelts. The new community was to be named Irvine; the old agricultural town of Irvine, where the railroad station and post office were located, was renamed East Irvine. The villages of Turtle Rock, University Park, Culverdale, the Ranch and Walnut were completed by 1970. On December 28, 1971, the residents of these communities voted to incorporate a substantially larger city than the one envisioned by the Pereira plan. By January 1999, Irvine had a population of 134,000 and a total area of 43 square miles (111 km²).

ABOUT ORANGE COUNTY:

Orange County is a county in Southern California, United States. Its county seat is Santa Ana. According to the 2000 Census, its population was 2,846,289, making it the second most populous county in the state of California, and the fifth most populous in the United States. The state of California estimates its population as of 2007 to be 3,098,121 people, dropping its rank to third, behind San Diego County. Thirty-four incorporated cities are located in Orange County; the newest is Aliso Viejo.

Unlike many other large centers of population in the United States, Orange County uses its county name as its source of identification whereas other places in the country are identified by the large city that is closest to them. This is because there is no defined center to Orange County like there is in other areas which have one distinct large city. Five Orange County cities have populations exceeding 170,000 while no cities in the county have populations surpassing 360,000. Seven of these cities are among the 200 largest cities in the United States.

Orange County is also famous as a tourist destination, as the county is home to such attractions as Disneyland and Knott's Berry Farm, as well as sandy beaches for swimming and surfing, yacht harbors for sailing and pleasure boating, and extensive area devoted to parks and open space for golf, tennis, hiking, kayaking, cycling, skateboarding, and other outdoor recreation. It is at the center of Southern California's Tech Coast, with Irvine being the primary business hub.

The average price of a home in Orange County is $541,000. Orange County is the home of a vast number of major industries and service organizations. As an integral part of the second largest market in America, this highly diversified region has become a Mecca for talented individuals in virtually every field imaginable. Indeed the colorful pageant of human history continues to unfold here; for perhaps in no other place on earth is there an environment more conducive to innovative thinking, creativity and growth than this exciting, sun bathed valley stretching between the mountains and the sea in Orange County.

Orange County was Created March 11 1889, from part of Los Angeles County, and, according to tradition, so named because of the flourishing orange culture. Orange, however, was and is a commonplace name in the United States, used originally in honor of the Prince of Orange, son-in-law of King George II of England.

Incorporated: March 11, 1889
Legislative Districts:
* Congressional: 38th-40th, 42nd & 43
* California Senate: 31st-33rd, 35th & 37
* California Assembly: 58th, 64th, 67th, 69th, 72nd & 74

County Seat: Santa Ana
County Information:
Robert E. Thomas Hall of Administration
10 Civic Center Plaza, 3rd Floor, Santa Ana 92701
Telephone: (714)834-2345 Fax: (714)834-3098
County Government Website: http://www.oc.ca.gov

CITIES OF ORANGE COUNTY CALIFORNIA:


City of Aliso Viejo, 92653, 92656, 92698
City of Anaheim, 92801, 92802, 92803, 92804, 92805, 92806, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92812, 92814, 92815, 92816, 92817, 92825, 92850, 92899
City of Brea, 92821, 92822, 92823
City of Buena Park, 90620, 90621, 90622, 90623, 90624
City of Costa Mesa, 92626, 92627, 92628
City of Cypress, 90630
City of Dana Point, 92624, 92629
City of Fountain Valley, 92708, 92728
City of Fullerton, 92831, 92832, 92833, 92834, 92835, 92836, 92837, 92838
City of Garden Grove, 92840, 92841, 92842, 92843, 92844, 92845, 92846
City of Huntington Beach, 92605, 92615, 92646, 92647, 92648, 92649
City of Irvine, 92602, 92603, 92604, 92606, 92612, 92614, 92616, 92618, 92619, 92620, 92623, 92650, 92697, 92709, 92710
City of La Habra, 90631, 90632, 90633
City of La Palma, 90623
City of Laguna Beach, 92607, 92637, 92651, 92652, 92653, 92654, 92656, 92677, 92698
City of Laguna Hills, 92637, 92653, 92654, 92656
City of Laguna Niguel
, 92607, 92677
City of Laguna Woods, 92653, 92654
City of Lake Forest, 92609, 92630, 92610
City of Los Alamitos, 90720, 90721
City of Mission Viejo, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92694
City of Newport Beach, 92657, 92658, 92659, 92660, 92661, 92662, 92663
City of Orange, 92856, 92857, 92859, 92861, 92862, 92863, 92864, 92865, 92866, 92867, 92868, 92869
City of Placentia, 92870, 92871
City of Rancho Santa Margarita, 92688, 92679
City of San Clemente, 92672, 92673, 92674
City of San Juan Capistrano, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92693, 92694
City of Santa Ana, 92701, 92702, 92703, 92704, 92705, 92706, 92707, 92708, 92711, 92712, 92725, 92728, 92735, 92799
City of Seal Beach, 90740
City of Stanton, 90680
City of Tustin, 92780, 92781, 92782
City of Villa Park, 92861, 92867
City of Westminster, 92683, 92684, 92685
City of Yorba Linda, 92885, 92886, 92887

Noteworthy communities Some of the communities that exist within city limits are listed below: * Anaheim Hills, Anaheim * Balboa Island, Newport Beach * Corona del Mar, Newport Beach * Crystal Cove / Pelican Hill, Newport Beach * Capistrano Beach, Dana Point * El Modena, Orange * French Park, Santa Ana * Floral Park, Santa Ana * Foothill Ranch, Lake Forest * Monarch Beach, Dana Point * Nellie Gail, Laguna Hills * Northwood, Irvine * Woodbridge, Irvine * Newport Coast, Newport Beach * Olive, Orange * Portola Hills, Lake Forest * San Joaquin Hills, Laguna Niguel * San Joaquin Hills, Newport Beach * Santa Ana Heights, Newport Beach * Tustin Ranch, Tustin * Talega, San Clemente * West Garden Grove, Garden Grove * Yorba Hills, Yorba Linda * Mesa Verde, Costa Mesa

Unincorporated communities These communities are outside of the city limits in unincorporated county territory: * Coto de Caza * El Modena * Ladera Ranch * Las Flores * Midway City * Orange Park Acres * Rossmoor * Silverado Canyon * Sunset Beach * Surfside * Trabuco Canyon * Tustin Foothills

Adjacent counties to Orange County Are: * Los Angeles County, California - north, west * San Bernardino County, California - northeast * Riverside County, California - east * San Diego County, California - southeast


About Mission Viejo California:
Located in South Orange County, Mission Viejo is a planned community that once had cattle grazing on its hillsides. The land was purchased from the O’Neill family nearly half a century ago, and the first homes were built in 1966. By the late 80’s, Mission Viejo became a city, and now houses almost 100,000 residents. Locals enjoy activities at the Mission Viejo Lake, shopping at The Shops at Mission Viejo and the Kaleidoscope Courtyard, and their biggest celebration of the year at the July 4th Street Fair. The community is also proud of their world renowned Nadadores swim team and Saddleback Community College, which offers some of the best courses in the county. The zipcodes of Mission Viejo are: 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92694

Mission Hospital is the largest hospital in south Orange County and serves as the area's regional trauma center. It also offers one of two Children's Hospital of Orange County locations providing care for children. Mission Viejo has numerous recreational areas such as the Norman P. Murray Community and Senior Center[18] there are about two parks per square mile. The city has three golf courses, The Mission Viejo Country Club, Casta del Sol Golf Course, and the Arroyo Trabuco Golf Club. At the center of the city is a man-made lake, Lake Mission Viejo, a private association for Mission Viejo residents with custom waterfront homes, condominiums, boat and paddle board rentals, fishing, and swim beaches. Lake Mission Viejo also holds events such as music concerts and movie screenings, usually complimentary for members and typically during the summer season. The Shops at Mission Viejo and the Kaleidescope Courtyards serve as the city's two main shopping, dining and entertainment centers. Both cater to an upper middle class customer demographic and feature family-oriented facilities and services. Mission Viejo also hosts a number of athletic events such as 5K runs and triathlons throughout the year. The city holds a variety of annually recurring events to celebrate holidays including a street fair and fireworks for Independence Day and public decorations and interactive activities for children during the winter holiday season featuring representation for multiple popular religions.

HISTORY
Mission Viejo was purchased by John Forster, a Mexican also known as Don Juan. During the Mexican-American War, Forster provided fresh horses to United States military forces which were used on the march of San Diego to retake Los Angeles. Mission Viejo was a hilly region primarily used as cattle and sheep grazing land, since it was of little use to farmers. This city was one of the last regions of Orange County to be urbanized due to its geologic complexity. In 1960, early developers dismissed most of the land in Mission Viejo as simply "undevelopable".[8] Donald Bren, an urban planner who later became the president of the Irvine Company, drafted a master plan which placed roads in the valleys and houses on the hills, and contoured to the geography of the area.[8] The plan worked, and by 1980 much of the city of Mission Viejo was completed. During the late 1970s and the 1980s, houses in Mission Viejo were in such high demand that housing tracts often sold out before construction even began on them.[9] The houses and shopping centers in the city are almost uniformly designed in a Spanish mission style, with "adobe"-like stucco walls and barrel-tile roofs. Many point to Mission Viejo as the first and largest manifestation of Bren's obsession with Spanish architecture. Bren's company was also the creator of the developments in Irvine, and Newport Beach. The company expanded its operations and went on to build the Lakes project in Tempe, Arizona, Mission Viejo Aurora in Colorado and was the initial master planner of Highlands Ranch, both in the Denver Metropolitan area. The seal of the city of Mission Viejo was designed and drawn by Carl Glassford, an artist and former resident of the city.

Sports
Mission Viejo has a major youth athletic facility, Mission Viejo Youth Athletic Park. The park consists of eight baseball fields and five soccer fields. It is host to Little League District 68, AYSO Region 84, and four competitive soccer clubs: Pateadores Soccer Club, Mission Viejo Soccer Club, West Coast Futbol Club, and Saddleback United Soccer Club. The Mission Viejo Nadadores Swimming and Mission Viejo Nadadores Diving Team won a string of national championships and produced a number of Olympians and world record holders in the 1970s and 1980s. Olympians included Shirley Babashoff, Brian Goodell, Larson Jenson, Maryanne Graham, Nicole Kramer, Casy Converse, Marcia Morey, Dara Torres, and Greg Louganis. Mission Viejo hosted the Road Cycling Events during the 1984 Summer Olympics held in Los Angeles. The old O'Neill Road was renamed Olympiad Rd. in honor of the Olympic events in 1984. There is also a soccer facility, now used by the town's youth soccer program, that was used as a training field by the United States men's national soccer team before and during the 1994 FIFA World Cup, hosted by the United States. Mission Viejo is the largest AYSO Region in the country. The Saddleback College ballpark hosted the Mission Viejo Vigilantes minor league baseball team of the Western Baseball League from 1996–2001. Now the ballpark has a semi-pro collegiate team, the Orange County Fire. Mission Viejo is also the hometown of NFL quarterback Mark Sanchez, Minnesota Twins pitcher Phil Hughes, and Chicago White Sox first baseman Adam LaRoche, former Milwaukee Brewers pitcher Don August, Boston Red Sox outfielder Allen Craig, Top Shot Season 4 Champion Chris Cheng, and PBA Tour Champion Scott Norton.

Mission Viejo neighbors the city of Lake Forest: Lake Forest is a planned community that was once a stagecoach stop between Los Angeles and San Diego. The community then called “El Toro” was in fact formed after WWII with the help of the El Toro Marine Base. Lake Forest became a city in the early 1990’s, and now prides itself on having the first of Orange County’s historical parks by establishing Heritage Hill; the park was created to preserve Lake Forest’s vibrant history. Lake Forest also has a new planned neighborhood, Foothill Ranch offers both wilderness and community. Foothill Ranch is home to The Whiting Ranch Wilderness Park, which consists of trails, rock formations, and streams as well as a rest stop and exhibits. This community is close to shopping, dining and entertainment in South Orange County. Within Lake Forest are the communities of Portola Hills, El Toro and Foothill Ranch. Lake Forest borders Aliso Viejo, Irvine, Mission Viejo, Laguna Hills, Laguna Woods, Laguna Beach and Rancho Santa Margarita. Lake Forest offers fantastic mountain views and quiet living for singles, couples and families in Orange County. Residents enjoy swimming, tennis, basketball, and volleyball at the brand new Concourse Park. The community is just minutes from various shopping centers and marketplaces. The zipcodes of Lake Forest are: 92609, 92630, 92610, 92679. And Mission Viejo neighbors the city of Rancho Santa Margarita: Before it was owned by the O’Neill family, Rancho Santa Margarita was home to Shoshonean Native Americans. RSM is one of the many planned communities in Orange County and is also one of the newest, having become a city in 2000. The community known as “A Small City with the Soul of a Small Village” is the perfect place for families and today nearly 50,000 people call it home. Community activities such as the Fourth of July Celebration and the Summer Concert Series are favorites among residents. Dove Canyon is a gated community in Rancho Santa Margarita. Within Rancho Santa Margarita are the communities of Dove Canyon and Coto De Caza that border the Cleveland National Forest and is best known for its choice golf courses. Rancho Santa Margarita borders Ladera Ranch, San Juan Capistrano, Mission Viejo, San Clemente, Talega, Trabucco Canyon and Laguna Niguel. Residents enjoy the outdoors at the Thomas F. Riley Wilderness Park and the Wagon Wheel Park Bike Trails, as well as a variety of community and family events such as the Boo Bash and Holiday in the Park. The zipcodes of Rancho Santa Margarita are: 92688, 92679.

 

 

Larry's customers come from all over Orange County, please find some of the zipcodes and cities below:
Anaheim 92801, 92802, 92803, 92804, 92805, 92806, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92812, 92814, 92815, 92816, 92817, 92825, 92850, 92899, Brea 92821, 92822, 92823, Buena Park 90620, 90621, 90622, 90623, 90624, Costa Mesa 92626, 92627, 92628, Cypress 90630, Fountain Valley 92708, 92728, Fullerton 92831, 92832, 92833, 92834, 92835, 92836, 92837, 92838, Garden Grove 92840, 92841, 92842, 92843, 92844, 92845, 92846, Huntington Beach 92605, 92615, 92646, 92647, 92648, 92649, La Habra 90631, 90632, 90633, La Palma 90623, Los Alamitos 90720, 90721, Orange 92856, 92857, 92859, 92861, 92862, 92863, 92864, 92865, 92866, 92867, 92868, 92869, Placentia 92870, 92871, Santa Ana 92701, 92702, 92703, 92704, 92705, 92706, 92707, 92708, 92711, 92712, 92725, 92728, 92735, 92799, Seal Beach 90740, Stanton 90680, Tusin 92780, 92781, 92782, Villa Park 92861, 92867, Westminister 92683, 92684, 92685, Yorba Linda 92885, 92886, 92887, Aliso Viejo 92653, 92656, 92698, Dana Point 92624, 92629, Irvine 92602, 92603, 92604, 92606, 92612, 92614, 92616, 92618, 92619, 92620, 92623, 92650, 92697, 92709, 92710, Laguna Beach 92607, 92637, 92651, 92652, 92653, 92654, 92656, 92677, 92698, Laguna Hills 92637, 92653, 92654, 92656, Laguna Niguel 92607, 92677, Laguna Woods 92653, 92654, Lake Forest 92609, 92630, Mission Viejo 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92694, Newport Beach 92657, 92658, 92659, 92660, 92661, 92662, 92663, Rancho Santa Margarita 92688, San Clemente 92672, 92673, 92674, San Juan Capistrano 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92693, 92694 Ladera Ranch 92694, Coto De Caza 92679 Anaheim Hills 92807, 92808, 92809, 92817 Dove Canyon 92679 Oceanside, CA:92049, 92051, 92052, 92054, 92055, 92056, 92057, 92058, Dove Canyon 92679

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CADILLAC REPAIR ORANGE COUNTY,Orange County Car Repair: Aliso Viejo, Irvine, Lake Forest, Rancho Santa Margarita, Lake Forest, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Laguna Niguel, Trabucco Hills, Foothill Ranch, Laguna Woods, San Juan Capistrano TOYOTA - HONDA - LEXUS - NISSAN - ACURA - INFINITI - MITSUBISHI - SUBARU - FORD - GMC - GM - VOLKSVAGEN - SUZUKI - KIA - CHEVROLET - CHRYSLER - DODGE - - CADILLAC - MERCURY - BUICK - LINCOLN - SATURN - PONTIAC - OLDSMOBILE - HYUNDAI - - PLYMOUTH, WE DO: Clutches, Brakes, Tune Ups, Transmission, Engines, Oil Changes, Electrical, AC, Steering, Alignment, Suspension, Auto Glass, Carburetor, Fuel Injection, Car Stereo, Alarms,All Makes & Models - Commercial Fleet Programs We Repair Cars, SUVs, Autos, Trucks, Diesels, Vans, RVs, Hybrids, Electric Vehicles, Flex Fuel Cars, CADILLAC REPAIR, ASE, ASC

We can work on the following Cars, Trucks, Vans, SUVs, and RVs:
Toyota, Honda, Lexus, Nissan, Infiniiti, Acura, Mitsubishi, Hyundia, Isuzu, Subaru, Mazda, Saturn, Land Rover, , GM, GMC, Ford, , Hummer, Jaguar, Volvo, Chrysler, Volkswagen, Volvo, Saab, Kia, Audi, Cadillac, Chevrolet, Buick, Aston Martin, Alfa Romeo, Ferrari, Oldsmobile, Peugeot, Porsche, Saturn, Pontiac,Corvette, Lincoln, Daewoo, -Benz, Daimler AG, Holden, Opel, Dodge, Plymoth, Rolls-Royce,
Prius, Highlander, Camry, Civic, Accent, Insight, Escape, Tahoe, GS 450h, Lexus LS 600h L, RX 400h, Mercury Mariner, Altima, Datsun, Blue Bird, SunnyBrook, Airstream, National RV, Thor, Starcraft, Georgie Boy, Rexhall, Holiday Rambler, Dutchmen, Newmar, Jayco, R-Vision, Keystone, Monaco, Forest River, Gulf Stream, Coachmen, Fleetwood, Winnebago.

CADILLAC Mission Viejo, CADILLAC REPAIR Mission Viejo Orange County, CADILLAC REPAIR Mission Viejo CA

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